Keir Starmer on edge as Labor leader grappling with ‘complex politics’: ‘He’s tense!’ | Politics | New

Sir Keir announced last week that the Labor Party would oppose new Brexit legislation aimed at easing trade friction. The Labor leader is opposing a government bill under which parts of the Northern Ireland protocol can be left unenforced. He claimed ministers should keep trying to reach an agreement with the EU in talks between London and Brussels to update the hated rules.

“There are still a huge number of people who are extremely determined to join the EU in the UK.

“It’s not a majority by any means, but enough that if they come out of the Labor Party coalition, well, that’s a problem for them too.

“And if they have to talk a lot about Europe and Northern Ireland, well, that’s going to put a strain on the Labor coalition.”

Before the UK left the EU, the two sides agreed on the protocol as a way to protect the bloc’s single market.

Indeed, Northern Ireland, which left the EU as part of the United Kingdom, shares a land border with the Republic of Ireland, which is still a member state.

“But this was a generation that came into politics at a time when Northern Ireland was seen as a settled issue.

“So they don’t have the inherent meaning of it, or what the sensitivities are.”

The political expert also claimed the Labor leader was reluctant to discuss Britain’s withdrawal from the EU.

He said: “Labour is going to have to ask itself if it’s a good thing to compromise with the European Union and be pro-European.

“That’s the last thing Starmer wants to talk about.”

Sir Keir was criticized during his leadership of the Labor Party for changing his stance on Brexit.

The politician voted to remain in the EU, but later said he would honor a referendum result.

He later admitted there could be a second referendum on UK membership of the EU, but later told Remainers the Brexit debate was “over”.

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